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We've tested Windows 7 for over a year on a wide variety of systems, including several desktops (most of which use dual- and quad-core x64-compatible CPUs), Media Center PCs, notebook computers, Tablet PCs, Touch Smart PCs, netbooks, and even an aging Ultra-Mobile PC. Of course; they all connect seamlessly and even work with Windows 7's Sync Center interface.

Windows 7's out-of-the-box (OOTB) compatibility with the built-in devices on each system we've tested has been stellar, even during the beta, and it only got better over time. Software Compatibility We regularly use and otherwise test what we feel is a representative collection of mostly modern software.

Hardware compatibility, surprisingly, was excellent, and virtually any hardware device that worked on 32-bit versions of Windows Vista also worked fine on 64-bit versions. Too often, a critical software application simply wouldn't install or work properly on 64-bit versions of Windows, making these versions a nonstarter for most. A huge number of compatibility issues were fixed over Windows Vista's first year on the market, and x64 versions of Windows Vista are now largely compatible, both from a hardware and software perspective, with anything that works with 32-bit versions of the system. With this system, x64 is now the mainstream hardware and software computing architecture for the first time, and you will most likely obtain an x64 version of Windows 7, no matter how you acquire it. So if you have a choice, open yourself up to the massive RAM improvements that accompany x64 versions of Windows 7.

Dealing with Software Incompatibility Regardless of Windows 7's compatibility successes, compatibility issues can still bite you when you least expect it.

We'll explain why this is so and how the situation is now changing in favor of 64-bit with Windows 7.

Secret: From a functional standpoint, x64 and 32-bit versions of Windows 7 are almost identical.

Based on our extensive testing and evidence provided by Microsoft, this is clearly the case.

64-bit versions of Windows 7, meanwhile, can access up to a whopping 192GB of RAM, depending on which version you get.

Virtually every single PC sold today does, in fact, include a 64-bit x64-compatible microprocessor, which means it is capable of running 64-bit versions of Windows 7.

However, until Windows 7, virtually all copies of Windows sold were the more mainstream 32-bit versions of the system.

Learn where MSPs should get started, explore the evolving hosted virtual desktop market, and find out what kind of customers could benefit from Daa S. While Windows 7 is largely compatible with the 32-bit software applications that Windows users have enjoyed for over a decade, some applications— and indeed, entire application classes, such as security software—simply won't work properly in Windows 7.

Some applications can be made to work using Windows 7's built-in compatibility modes, as discussed below. Those that can't—like legacy 16-bit software or custom software typically found in small businesses—might be able to find solace in the new XP Mode feature in Windows 7. A final compatibility issue that shouldn't be overlooked is one raised by the ongoing migration to 64-bit (x64) computing.

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(With the following exception: when you install Windows 7 Home Basic or Starter, you don't gain access to Windows Aero—but this is due to limitations of the OS, not the hardware.) As always, you could still run into hardware issues with older scanners, printers, and similar peripherals, especially if you're coming from Windows XP. We've also tested numerous video games to see how they fare under Windows 7.

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